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131st CES helps Missouri ANG C-STARS program expand

SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE, Ill. --Instructors monitor patient blood pressure and vital signs during a simulation at the newly opened Emergency Trauma Simulation Lab at the St. Louis University Hospital. During varying scenarios instructors can instantly change patient’s vital signs to see how the students react to a situation.(U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Wesley Farnsworth)

Students in the C-STARS program participate in a medical treatment simulation. The scenario depicts three patients with blast injuries. Behind the scenes instructors monitor the students progress using visual observation, electronic data monitoring, and video recording. Once the scenario is complete all the data will be collected and briefed for immediate feedback. (Photo by Airman 1st Class Wesley Farnsworth)

Students participate in a medical simulation at the C-STARS program at St. Louis University Medical Center, St. Louis, Feb. 17 (Photo by Airman 1st Class Wesley Farnsworth)

Students participate in a medical simulation at the C-STARS program at St. Louis University Medical Center, St. Louis, Feb. 17 (Photo by Airman 1st Class Wesley Farnsworth)

SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE, Ill. --Students train in a real-time simulation that will help them prepare for their upcoming deployments. The simulators used in the C-STARS training program are the latest patient simulation technology; they are able to speak, breathe, bleed and can be administered medication that will affect their vital signsU.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Wesley Farnsworth)

Students train in a real-time simulation that will help them prepare for their upcoming deployments. The simulators used in the C-STARS training program are the latest patient simulation technology; they are able to speak, breathe, bleed, and can be administered medication that will affect their vital signs. (Photo By Airman 1st Class Wesley Farnsworth)

Lambert IAP -- Members from the 131st Civil Engineering Squadron recently assisted the Center for Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills and St. Louis University Medical Center with an expansion project.

The expansion included demolition and reconstruction of a multiple patient medical simulation center within the hospital.

When describing the new expansion, Lt. Col. Robert Bell, Missouri Air National Guard physician assistant said, "The 131st was great, they really made it happen."

The C-STARS simulations depict multiple patients having high velocity gun shot wounds, blast, and burn injuries.

C-STARS is a two week joint calloboration between the Missouri Air National Guard and the USAF School of Aerospace Medicine that was developed to train medical staff using computerized life-like mannequins and trauma scenarios that simulate patient care in combat environments.

The late Col. (Dr.) Michael Hayek, 131st Medical Squadron commander and director of trauma surgery at DePaul Health Center, strongly believed that military members should have a chance to receive training with these types of injuries prior to deployment, allowing them an opportunity to enhance their skills.

Col. Charles Fischer, U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine commander, said, during the ribbon cutting ceremony, "This center deserves credit for the people that return [from combat] due to the training that is received here."

According to Bell, the C-STARS program was initiated over six years ago when the late Mr. Hayek realized that traditional guardsmen did not see injuries similar to the ones seen in combat.

Col. Jeffrey A. Bailey, director of the C-Stars program in St. Louis, explained, this center is the "new wave in medical training."

Approximately 380 students complete this program each year.